US Army Trucks of the Cold War to this day

Over 10,000,000 vehicles 1947-Today

About US Trucks from 1947 to this day



During the Cold War, the United States developed and deployed a variety of trucks for military use. These trucks were designed to transport troops, equipment, and supplies in a variety of environments, including the harsh cold weather conditions of Europe and other regions.

One of the most iconic trucks used by the US military during the Cold War was the M35 "Deuce and a Half" truck. This was a two-and-a-half-ton cargo truck that was used extensively by the US Army from the 1950s through the 1990s. The M35 was designed to be highly reliable and capable of operating in a variety of environments, including the extreme cold weather conditions of northern Europe.

In addition to the M35, the US military also deployed a variety of other trucks during the Cold War, including the M54, M809, and M939 series of cargo trucks. These trucks were larger and more powerful than the M35, and were capable of carrying heavier loads over longer distances.

The US military also developed specialized trucks for use in cold weather conditions, including the M123A1C tractor and M127A1C semi-trailer combination. These trucks were used to transport fuel and other critical supplies to remote locations in Alaska and other cold weather regions.

Overall, the US military's truck fleet played a critical role in supporting its Cold War operations, allowing troops and supplies to be rapidly transported across large distances and difficult terrain, and this between the Korean War, Vietnam war, Nigaragua Intervention, Somalia, Gulf War, Iraq and Afghanistan. With constant deployments, specifications and usage changed over time. And it was not just about softskin trucks and light tactical vehicles (classed as "trucks" anyway, the difference was in the weight load), but also artillery tractors such as the M578.

In search for the new light US Army workhorse

Post-war military Jeeps

The original WW2 Jeep was used and imitated around the world. France for example copied it via Delahaye and Hotchkiss, and the latter after 1954 manufactured Jeeps under license. In Japan it was built by Mitsubishi Motors and Toyota. The British Land Rover was also largely inspired by the Jeep, as the British Army avidly used it in WW2. This utilitarian vehicle was hailed by industrial designers and museum alike, the Museum of Modern Art describing it as a masterpiece of functionalist design. Ernie Pyle called it, with the G.I. Pocket Stove, "the two most important pieces of noncombat equipment ever developed." These arrived soon also on the surplus market. Civilian applications were legion, pushing the chassis and engines to their extreme limited, like the Philippine's Jeepney, a stretched-out heavily modified bus made from a Jeep, also heavily decorated. Comimg from surplus MBs and GPWs, they have become a symbol of "modern" Philippines. Backyard assemblers also constructed replica Jeeps with stainless steel bodies and surplus parts for the local market.

In the US military, the Jeep started to age in the 1950s and found several successions, each time only gradually improved but very much on the same flavour as the original. Outside the CJ, earliest derivative mostly used abroad, the M38 was soon the true successor of the model, and the Ford M151 Mutt in the 1970s, up to the Humvee.

Willys Jeep CJ (1945)


The Willys GP was followed by CJ at the end of the war, a version aimed at former GI and more in tune with Civilioan specifications, in short, "demilitarized". It was thus not used officially by the US Army, but produced to a very large amount in several sub-variants until 1970, used in many militaries throughout the world. Here a CJ-3B with tarpaulin.

Willys CJ-V35/U


After World War II, Jeep began to experiment with new designs and notably a model that can still running underwater. On February 1, 1950, a contract was approved for 1,000 vehicles called the CJ-V35/U (U standing for Underwater) which were "especially adapted for general reconnaissance or command communications" and capable of operating for short period underwatern usable both for landing and fording, the engine having a snorkel system to breathe underwater. Of course the amount of water it could ford was directly linked to the height of the snorkel mast. It inspired however a whole generation of snorkel-equipped 4x4 vehicles, enabling unprecedented mobility. Note: no cc photo of the vehicle, here is the CJ-3A instead. More info

Willys M715 (1965)


The Jeep M715 developed in 1965 is another interesting development, of a much larger vehicle called 1.25-short-ton army truck. It was a "remilitarized" version of the civilian J-series, and it served extensively in the Vietnam War. It had haeavier full-floating axlesp plus a foldable flat windshield. It is still used by the military of many countries and produced by Kia under license.

Willys MC/M38 (1949-52)


This was the first true sucessor of the famous Jeep, an all-out improvement of the original by the very same company. The vehicle general outlook was still very reminiscent of the MB. It was extensively used in the Korean War, Vietnam War, Laotian Civil War, Lebanese Civil War and many other conflicts as it saw extensive use abroad as well. It was produced by Willys-Overland from 1949 to 1952 to an extent of 45,473, a far cry from WW2 production, but still impressive nonetheless. Here a M38A1 of the Vietnam war.

Willys M606 (1953-68)


The M606 was the military equivalent to the CJ-3B, only variant used in limited numbers with the US Army. It was pretty much just the CJ-3B straight off the assembly line but with heavy-duty options like larger tires and springs, a special rear bumper to hold the Pintle Hook and bumperettes, a black-out lamp on the front left fender, and specific windshield not used on civilian models. It was widely exported.

M151 Mutt (1959-88)


Along with the "Mighty Mite" this was the last attempt to provide the US Military with a worthy successor of the Jeep, in its primitive form. It was produced to an extent of 100,000 vehicles by Ford, Kaiser, and AM General. Called Truck, Utility, ¼-Ton, 4×4, M151 or simply M151, it was the successor to the Korean War M38 and M38A1 jeep. The M151 had an integrated body design which offered a little more space than prior jeeps, and featured all-around independent suspension with coil springs. More modern than the WW2 Willys celebrity, it was also largely exported and built under licence, and saw action in the Vietnam war.

M422 Mighty Mite (1959-62)


Last "classic" open light general purpose vehicle of the US Amy before the new armored standard that was the Hummer or HMMV, the M422 was manufactured by American Motors Corporation (AMC) as an airborne, lightweight version of the Jeep. Called the "lightweight ¼-ton 4x4 tactical truck", it was mostly used by the US Marines, and heliborne, making its baptism of fire in Vietnam. Only 1,250 and 2,672 M422A1 were manufactured total.

M274 1/2-ton 4x4 Mule (1959-62)


The U.S. Military M274 Truck, Platform, Utility, 1/2 Ton, 4X4 is a singular vehicle in US ordnance. A barebone "Carrier, Light Weapons, Infantry, 1/2 ton, 4x4" popularly known as the "Mule" or the "Military Mule", or "Mechanical Mule". It was a 4-wheel drive, gasoline-powered tractor vehicle able to carry just 1/2 short ton (0.45 tonnes) off-road. The engine was placed under the main platform to spare space and the driver was located on a left-side seat with pedals, gears and a wheel, and... nothing else. The vehicle was super-light, compact to be dismounted and air-transportable by any helicopter. It was used notabl in Vietnam as a way to accompany troops with their gear and supply.

HMMWV (1982)


The HMMWV, also known as the Humvee, is a military vehicle that was designed and produced by AM General Corporation for the United States military. It was first introduced in 1984 as a replacement for the aging fleet of military jeeps. The HMMWV was designed to be a highly mobile, all-terrain vehicle that could transport troops, supplies, and equipment in a variety of combat situations. It has a low profile, which makes it less visible to enemy forces, and it is highly maneuverable, which allows it to navigate rough terrain and tight spaces.

The HMMWV is powered by a diesel engine and is equipped with four-wheel drive and independent suspension. It can carry up to four passengers and has a payload capacity of over 2,500 pounds. The vehicle can also be outfitted with a variety of weapons and other equipment to suit a variety of missions. The HMMWV has been used extensively by the US military in a variety of conflicts, including the Gulf War, the Iraq War, and the War in Afghanistan. It has also been sold or given to foreign militaries and civilian organizations, and it has become a popular subject for customization and modification by civilian enthusiasts. See the full article here. Note: It's not featured in truck encyclopedia, due to the fact the Humvee is not "soft-skinned" but has a light but efficient High-Tensile aluminium 8 mm (0.3-in) armour. It's true from most MPVs developed for Iraq and Afghanistan in the 1995-2010 period.

Desert Patrol Vehicle (1991)


The Desert Patrol Vehicle (DPV) is a high-speed, off-road vehicle that was developed for use by the United States military. It was specifically designed to operate in desert environments and was used extensively during the Gulf War and other military operations in the Middle East. The DPV is a lightweight, two-person vehicle that is powered by a high-performance engine and is equipped with a long-travel suspension system. It has a top speed of over 80 miles per hour and can travel over rough terrain, sand dunes, and other obstacles with ease.

The DPV is designed to be highly maneuverable, with a small turning radius and a low center of gravity. It is also equipped with advanced navigation and communication systems, which allow it to operate effectively in the harsh and remote desert environments. The DPV was used extensively by US special forces during the Gulf War, where it was used for reconnaissance, surveillance, and other special operations. It has since been replaced by newer vehicles, but it remains a popular vehicle among military enthusiasts and has been used in civilian racing and off-road competitions.

Interim Fast Attack Vehicle (1995)


The Interim Fast Attack Vehicle (IFAV) is a lightweight, high-mobility vehicle that was developed for the United States Marine Corps (USMC) in the early 2000s. It was designed to provide USMC infantry units with a fast, agile, and versatile vehicle that could be rapidly deployed to remote and rugged terrain. The IFAV is a four-wheel-drive vehicle that is powered by a diesel engine and is equipped with a four-speed automatic transmission. It has a top speed of around 90 miles per hour and can traverse a variety of terrains, including sand, rocks, and mud.

The IFAV can carry up to four passengers and is equipped with a variety of weapon systems, including machine guns and grenade launchers. It is also equipped with advanced navigation and communication systems, which allow it to operate effectively in the field. The IFAV was used by USMC units in Iraq and Afghanistan, where it was used for a variety of missions, including reconnaissance, surveillance, and convoy escort. It was later replaced by the more advanced and capable Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), which entered service in the mid-2010s.

M1161 Growler (1999)


The M1161 Growler is a light tactical vehicle developed for the United States Marine Corps (USMC) by General Dynamics. It is a four-wheel-drive vehicle that is designed to provide USMC infantry units with a fast, agile, and versatile vehicle that can be rapidly deployed to remote and rugged terrain. The Growler is powered by a 1.9-liter turbocharged diesel engine and is equipped with a four-speed automatic transmission. It has a top speed of around 80 miles per hour and can traverse a variety of terrains, including sand, rocks, and mud.

The Growler can carry up to four passengers and is equipped with a variety of weapon systems, including machine guns and grenade launchers. It is also equipped with advanced navigation and communication systems, which allow it to operate effectively in the field. The Growler has been used by USMC units in Iraq and Afghanistan, where it has been used for a variety of missions, including reconnaissance, surveillance, and convoy escort. It has also been sold or given to foreign militaries, including the armed forces of the United Arab Emirates and the Republic of Korea. The Growler is still in service with the USMC and remains a popular vehicle among military enthusiasts.

Boeing Phantom Badger (2013)


The Boeing Phantom Badger is a lightweight tactical vehicle developed by the Boeing Defense, Space & Security division for use by military and special forces units. It is designed to be highly versatile, adaptable, and easy to transport to remote and rugged terrain. The Phantom Badger is a four-wheel-drive vehicle that is powered by a diesel engine and is equipped with a six-speed automatic transmission. It has a top speed of around 80 miles per hour and can traverse a variety of terrains, including sand, rocks, and mud.

The Phantom Badger can carry up to four passengers and is designed to be modular, with a variety of configurations that can be easily adapted to different mission requirements. It can be outfitted with a variety of weapon systems, including machine guns and grenade launchers, and is also equipped with advanced navigation and communication systems. The Phantom Badger is designed to be easily transportable, with a low weight and compact dimensions that allow it to be carried by a variety of military aircraft, including helicopters and transport planes. It can also be rapidly deployed and operated in a variety of scenarios, including reconnaissance, surveillance, and convoy escort.

The Phantom Badger has been used by US special forces and other military units in a variety of conflicts, including in Afghanistan and Iraq. It remains a popular vehicle among military enthusiasts and has also been adapted for use in civilian applications, such as search and rescue and emergency response.

Polaris Dagor (2014)


The Polaris DAGOR (Deployable Advanced Ground Off-Road) is a lightweight, off-road vehicle developed by Polaris Defense for military use. It is designed to provide transport and support for infantry units in remote and rugged terrain. The DAGOR is a four-wheel-drive vehicle that is powered by a diesel engine and is equipped with an automatic transmission. It has a top speed of around 80 miles per hour and can traverse a variety of terrains, including sand, rocks, and mud. The DAGOR can carry up to nine passengers and is equipped with a variety of weapon systems, including machine guns and grenade launchers. It is also equipped with advanced navigation and communication systems, which allow it to operate effectively in the field.

The DAGOR is designed to be easily transportable, with a low weight and compact dimensions that allow it to be carried by a variety of military aircraft, including helicopters and transport planes. It can also be rapidly deployed and operated in a variety of scenarios, including reconnaissance, surveillance, and convoy escort. The DAGOR has been used by the US military and other militaries around the world in a variety of conflicts, including in Afghanistan and Iraq. It remains a popular vehicle among military enthusiasts and has also been adapted for use in civilian applications, such as search and rescue and emergency response

US Army Trucks from 1947 to this day

Compared to the situation in WW2, the ordnance bureau in the cold war, when asked to gradually replace its park of worn-out mass-built trucks, like the iconic GMC CCKW choose a universal platform that could be used for all tasks and specialities, the Reo (and many others) M35 (175,000 built and more) or the M39 (same specs) by International Harvester, declined into multiple version such as the M54 tactical truck (150,000+). But the need for smaller trucks led to define also the M37 3/4-ton 4x4 (136,000 built) which soldiered in the Korean War and Vietnam.

Dodge M37 3/4-ton 4x4 (1951)


The Dodge M37 is a three-quarter ton four-wheel drive truck that was designed for military use and was manufactured by Dodge during the period from 1951 to 1968. It was primarily used by the United States Army and other military organizations. The M37 was powered by a Dodge T-245 gasoline engine, which was a six-cylinder inline engine that produced around 78 horsepower. The engine was mated to a four-speed manual transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or four-wheel drive.

The M37 was designed to be a versatile vehicle that could be used for a variety of purposes, including troop transport, cargo transport, and as a platform for mounting weapons. It was also used for civilian purposes after its military service, such as a fire truck, ambulance, or even as a snowplow. The Dodge M37 is considered a rugged and reliable vehicle, and it has gained a following among collectors and enthusiasts of military vehicles.

Reo 2+1/2-ton 6x6 M35 (1950)


The M35 series 2½-ton 6×6 cargo truck is the emblematic cold war US military truck. It was produced from 1950 to this day, and it's not over, as the basic vehicle was constantly upgraded and modernized to stand the test of time. Design by REO in 1949 it was mass-produced by REO, Kaiser, Studebaker, and AM General. It was also the main army truck of South Korea, produced by Kia and Ssangyong as well as the Canadian Armed Forces by Bombardier. The main US version were produced from 1950 to 1988 for the M35A1 and M35A2 and from 1994 to 1999 M35A3, until replacement by the HMTT family.

M39 5-ton 6x6 (1951)


The M39 series is a family of 5-ton 6x6 military trucks that were produced by the United States Army in the 1950s and 1960s. The trucks were designed to be used for a variety of purposes, including cargo transport, troop transport, and as a platform for mounting weapons. The M39 series included several different models, including the M39, M40, M41, M42, and M44. These models differed in terms of their wheelbase, body style, and equipment, but they all shared a common chassis and drivetrain.

The M39 series was powered by a Continental LDS-465-1A six-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine, which produced around 175 horsepower. The engine was mated to a five-speed manual transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or six-wheel drive. The M39 series was known for its durability and reliability, and it was used by the United States Army and other military organizations for several decades. The trucks were eventually phased out of military service in the 1990s, but many have since been sold to civilian buyers and are still in use today as heavy-duty work trucks or as vehicles for off-road adventures.

M123/M125 10-ton 6x6 truck (1955)


In the segment of heavy trucks, still 6x6 and off-road, Mack came as usual with a solid contender. The M125 is a 10-ton 6x6 military truck that was produced by the United States Army in the 1950s and 1960s. It was primarily used for cargo transport, and it was designed to be able to carry heavy loads over rough terrain. The M125 was powered by a Cummins NHC-250 six-cylinder diesel engine, which produced around 250 horsepower. The engine was mated to a five-speed manual transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or six-wheel drive.

The M125 had a large cargo bed with fold-down sides, and it could be equipped with a canvas cover for protection from the elements. The truck also had a winch mounted on the front bumper, which could be used to pull other vehicles or to move heavy objects. The M125 was known for its ruggedness and durability, and it was used by the United States Army and other military organizations for several decades. It was eventually phased out of military service in the 1980s, but some examples have since been sold to civilian buyers and are still in use today as heavy-duty work trucks or for off-road adventures. "Only" 4,132 M123/125 semi-tractor for tank transporter prime mover cargo truck were produced by Mack and CONDEC until 1969. As usual in the late 1980s they ended in the national guard.

Kaiser Jeep M715 1+1/4-ton 4x4 (1967)


The M715 is a 1¼-ton 4x4 military truck that was produced by the United States Army from 1967 to 1969. It was based on the civilian Jeep Gladiator truck but was modified for military use. The M715 was powered by a 230 cubic inch (3.8-liter) inline six-cylinder gasoline engine that produced around 132 horsepower. The engine was mated to a four-speed manual transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or four-wheel drive.

The M715 had a heavy-duty chassis and suspension, as well as a reinforced body and bed for carrying cargo. It also featured a 24-volt electrical system, blackout lights, and a front-mounted winch. The M715 was primarily used for troop transport, cargo transport, and as a platform for mounting weapons. It was eventually phased out of military service in the 1980s, but many examples have since been sold to civilian buyers and are still in use today as off-road vehicles or as collector's items. The M715 has gained a following among enthusiasts of military vehicles and off-road vehicles, and it is known for its ruggedness and durability. It was also the last vehicle produced by the Jeep Corporation for military use. In total, between 30,500 and 33,000 were built.

Chance vought M561 1+1/4-ton 6x6 "Gama Goat" (1969)


The M561, commonly known as the "Gama Goat," is a six-wheel drive amphibious vehicle that was developed by the United States Army in the late 1960s. It was designed to be used for a variety of purposes, including cargo transport, troop transport, and as a platform for mounting weapons.

The Gama Goat was powered by a Detroit Diesel 3-53T three-cylinder two-stroke diesel engine that produced around 175 horsepower. The engine was mated to a four-speed manual transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or six-wheel drive. The Gama Goat had a unique articulated design, which allowed it to navigate rough terrain and cross bodies of water. It also had a large cargo bed and could be equipped with a canvas cover for protection from the elements.

Despite its innovative design, the Gama Goat was not without its issues. It was known for being difficult to maintain and repair, and it was eventually phased out of military service in the 1990s. Today, the Gama Goat is considered a collector's item among enthusiasts of military vehicles and off-road vehicles. Its unusual design and amphibious capabilities make it a unique and interesting vehicle to own and operate.

M656 5-ton 8x8 truck (1968)


The M656 is a 5-ton 8x8 military truck that was produced by the United States Army in the 1960s and 1970s. It was primarily used for cargo transport and was designed to be able to carry heavy loads over rough terrain. The M656 was powered by a Continental AVDS-1790-2A eight-cylinder diesel engine, which produced around 450 horsepower. The engine was mated to an Allison MT654CR six-speed automatic transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or eight-wheel drive.

The M656 had a large cargo bed with drop sides and a tailgate, and it could be equipped with a canvas cover for protection from the elements. The truck also had a hydraulic crane mounted on the bed, which could be used to lift and move heavy objects. The M656 was known for its ruggedness and durability, and it was used by the United States Army and other military organizations for several decades. It was eventually phased out of military service in the 1990s, but some examples have since been sold to civilian buyers and are still in use today as heavy-duty work trucks or for off-road adventures. It was produced by Ford in 1968-69 and made into six versions, including several dedicated to use the Pershing 1a missile.

CUCV/COTS M880/980 (1976)


The concept of "technicals", mostly Toyota pickups featured in many civil wars and in asymetric warfare gave the idea to the post-Vietnam cash-strapped US military to launch the "Commercial Utility Cargo Vehicle", based on civilian models (Dodge here) and produced to military-grade to some 44,000 units in 1976–1977 with Dodge components at Warren Truck Assembly. After the CUCV II in 1987 by Chevy, appeared the last generation LSSV by GM. It's still an ongoing concept which found a lot of resonance in militaries around the world.

M809 series 5-ton 6×6 truck (1970)


The M809 series is a family of 5-ton 6x6 military trucks that were produced by the United States Army from the 1970s through the 1990s. The series includes several different variants, including cargo trucks, dump trucks, and wrecker trucks. The M809 trucks were powered by a Cummins NTC 855 diesel engine, which produced around 250-335 horsepower depending on the variant. The engine was mated to a five- or six-speed manual transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or six-wheel drive.

The cargo variants of the M809 had a large open bed with fold-down sides, while the dump trucks had a hydraulic dump bed for unloading cargo. The wrecker variant had a heavy-duty crane mounted on the back for lifting and towing disabled vehicles. The M809 trucks were known for their ruggedness and durability, and they were used by the United States Army and other military organizations for several decades. They were eventually phased out of military service in the 2000s, but many examples have since been sold to civilian buyers and are still in use today as heavy-duty work trucks or for off-road adventures. The M809 series of trucks have a large following among military vehicle enthusiasts and collectors due to their distinctive design, impressive capabilities, and historical significance. It was produced to by AM General in 1970–1982 and replaced by the M890, often refurbished M809.

M939 series 5-ton 6×6 truck (1982)


The M939 series is a family of 5-ton 6x6 military trucks that were produced by the United States Army from the 1980s through the 1990s. The series includes several different variants, including cargo trucks, dump trucks, and tractor trucks. The M939 trucks were powered by a Cummins NHC-250 diesel engine, which produced around 240 horsepower. The engine was mated to a five-speed manual transmission and a two-speed transfer case, which allowed the driver to select either two-wheel or six-wheel drive.

The cargo variants of the M939 had a large open bed with fold-down sides, while the dump trucks had a hydraulic dump bed for unloading cargo. The tractor variant was designed to pull heavy trailers, and it had a fifth-wheel hitch mounted on the frame. The M939 trucks were known for their ruggedness and durability, and they were used by the United States Army and other military organizations for several decades. They were eventually phased out of military service in the 2000s, but many examples have since been sold to civilian buyers and are still in use today as heavy-duty work trucks or for off-road adventures.

The M939 series of trucks have a large following among military vehicle enthusiasts and collectors due to their distinctive design, impressive capabilities, and historical significance. They are also popular among off-road enthusiasts, who appreciate their durability and ability to tackle tough terrain.

M520 Truck, Cargo, 8-ton, 4x4 Goer (1972)


The M520 Goer is a military vehicle that was first introduced in the early 1950s. It was designed and built by the Pacific Car and Foundry Company, which is now known as PACCAR Inc. The M520 Goer was primarily used by the United States Army as a heavy-duty transporter for a variety of equipment, including tanks, artillery pieces, and other heavy vehicles. It was also used for other military operations such as the construction of bridges and other infrastructure.

The M520 Goer had a unique design that included a front-mounted engine and a hydraulically-powered steering system that allowed it to navigate rough terrain and tight spaces. It was powered by a 375 horsepower diesel engine and had a top speed of 35 miles per hour. The M520 Goer was replaced by newer military vehicles in the 1980s, but some units remain in service with foreign militaries and civilian contractors. In total, 1400 were built until 1976 in the M520 Cargo, M559 Fuel Servicing Tanker Truck, and M553 Wrecker Truck as well as the M877 Cargo Truck with Material Handling Crane.

M915 Truck, Tractor, 14-ton, 6x4 (1975)


The M915 is a series of heavy-duty trucks that were produced for the United States military by Freightliner Corporation in the 1970s and 1980s. The trucks were designed to transport heavy equipment and supplies, and they were used in a variety of military operations. The M915 series includes several variants, including the M915 tractor truck, which is designed to haul semi-trailers, and the M916 light equipment transporter, which is designed to carry heavy equipment and supplies on a flatbed trailer.

The M915 series is powered by a 14-liter Detroit Diesel engine and is equipped with an Allison automatic transmission. The trucks have a maximum speed of around 60 miles per hour and a range of approximately 500 miles. The M915 series was widely used by the US military during the 1980s and 1990s, and many of these trucks were also sold or given to foreign militaries after they were retired from US service. Some M915 trucks have also been converted for civilian use, including as heavy-duty tow vehicles and as transporters for oversized cargo.

M911 Tractor Truck (1978)


The M911 tank transporter is a heavy-duty truck designed to haul tanks and other armored vehicles. It was produced by the American truck manufacturer Kenworth in the late 1970s and early 1980s for the United States Army. The M911 features a powerful 500 horsepower Cummins diesel engine, an Allison automatic transmission, and a hydraulically operated fifth wheel for connecting to a trailer. It also has a hydraulic winch for loading and unloading tanks and other heavy equipment.

The M911 was designed to work in tandem with the M747 heavy equipment transporter trailer, which was specifically designed to transport tanks and other large military vehicles. Together, the M911 and M747 formed a powerful combination that could transport some of the heaviest and most powerful military vehicles in the US Army's inventory.

The M911 and M747 were both used extensively during the 1980s and 1990s, but they were eventually replaced by newer models. Some M911s and M747s remain in use with the US military today, and they have also been sold or given to foreign militaries after they were retired from US service.
To Come:
  • HEMTT M977 10-ton 8x8 (1982)
  • M915A2 series 15-ton[v] 6x4 (1990)
  • LMTV[t] M1078 2+1⁄2-ton 4x4 (1991)
  • Freightliner HET[x] M1070 Heavy 8x8 (1993)
  • MTVR 7-ton 6x6 (1999)
  • 7000MV HD 6x6 (2005)
  • MTV M1083 5-ton 6x6 (2005)
  • LVSR Heavy 10x10 (2009)

Soft-Skinned Artillery Tractors


M4 High Speed Tractor, too late for WW2, right for the Korean War


M8A1 High Speed Tractor


M548 tractor, from the Vietnam to the Gulf War.




During the Cold War, the United States military deployed a variety of artillery tractors to transport artillery pieces and other heavy equipment. These tractors were designed to be highly maneuverable and capable of operating in a variety of environments, including rough terrain and extreme cold weather conditions. One of the most widely used artillery tractors during the Cold War was the M578 Light Recovery Vehicle. This vehicle was based on the M107 self-propelled howitzer chassis and was used primarily to recover and tow damaged or disabled vehicles, including artillery pieces.

Another commonly used artillery tractor was the M548 tracked cargo carrier. This vehicle was designed to transport ammunition, supplies, and other equipment, and was capable of carrying up to 10,000 pounds of cargo over rough terrain. The M578 and M548 were both used extensively by the US military during the Cold War, and were deployed in a variety of conflicts, including the Vietnam War and the Gulf War. These vehicles were praised for their reliability and versatility, and played a critical role in supporting artillery operations on the battlefield.

In addition to these vehicles, the US military also deployed a variety of other artillery tractors during the Cold War, including the M35 cargo truck, which was often used to transport artillery pieces and other heavy equipment, and the M114 armored personnel carrier, which was sometimes used as a towing vehicle for smaller artillery pieces.

(More to come)

Links/Src

Books

Encyclopedia of Modern U. S. Military Tactical Vehicles
M520 Goer - M561 Gama Goat Articulated Trucks of the US Army in the Cold War - Tankograd 3018

Links

Willys M606 on military-vehicle.org
bizarre-american-gun-trucks-in-iraq

Videos

WW1 Vehicles

British ww2 WWI trucks
British ww2 British WWI Vehicles
LGOC B-type troop Bus
Mack AC
Pierce-Arrow AA truck
BSA 14/18 hp-20/25 hp
BSA 13.9 h.p
Lanchester staff Car
Thornycroft J
Maudslay Lorry
AEC Y Type
Foster-Daimler Tractor
Motorc. Triumph H
Ford Model T Patrol Car
FWD Model B 3-ton Lorry
Leyland 3-ton truck
Vulcan truck
Vauxhall D-type staff car
Crossley 20/25 staff car
French ww2 French WWI Vehicles
Berliet CBA
Berliet Type M
Châtillon-Panhard Tractor
Panhard K11
Latil TAR Tractor
Panhard-Genty 24 HP
Renault EG
Renault AG1 Landaulet
Renault Truck 60CV
Renault FB Artillery Portee
Schneider CD Artillery Tractor
Soviet ww2 Russian WWI Vehicles
(list in research)
US ww2 US WWI Vehicles
Holt tractor
Liberty Trucks, assembled by:
  • Bethlehem
  • Brockway
  • Diamond T
  • Gardford
  • Gramm-Berstein
  • Indiana
  • Kelly-Springfield
  • Packard
  • Pierce-Arrow
  • Republic
  • Selden
  • SMTC
  • Sterling
  • USMTC
  • Velie
  • Dart
  • Lafrance
Cadillac trucks/staff cars
Ricker truck
Ford Model T Mil.
Spruce log truck
Dodge M1918 Light Repair truck
Dart BB, E, L, Liberty CC4, J Tractor
5-ton Artillery Tractor
Ford Model T Ambulance
Mack AC "Bulldog" Truck
Holt 15-ton Tractor
Jeffery Quad Lorry
FWD Model B‎
FWD SU-COE‎‎
Italy ww1 Italian WWI Vehicles
Lancia IZ
Fiat 15ter Ambulance
Fiat 15ter Lorry
Fiat 18BL Lorry
Hersent-Thiriont Flamethrower
(list in research)
Soviet ww2 Japanese WWI Vehicles
(list in research)
Belgian Dutch ww2 Belgian, Dutch and other WWI vehicles
Berna C2 Truck (Swiss)
(list in research)
German Empire ww1 German WWI Vehicles
A7V Überlandwagen
Beobachtungsanhänger
Büssing KZW1800 Artillery Tractor
Daimler Marienfelde Truck
Field Artillery Limbers
Große FeldKüche Hf.13
Mercedes 37/95 Staff Car
(list in research)
Soviet ww2 Austro-Hungarian Vehicles
Austro-Daimler Lorry
Austro-Daimler Artilleriezugwagen
B-Zug Artillery Tractor
Feldküche M.1915

Turkish vehicles Turkish WWI Vehicles
(list in research)

allied ww2 Allied ww2 Vehicles

British ww2 British Vehicles
-AEC Armoured Command Vehicle (415)
-AEC Matador
-Albion CX22S
-Albion FT15N
-Albion WD.CX24
-Austin K2/Y Ambulance
-Austin K3
-Austin K4
-Austin K4 Dropside
-Austin K5
-Austin K6 GS
-Austin K6 Gantry
-Bedford MW
-Bedford OXA Armoured
-Bedford OXC Semi-trailer
-Bedford OXD GS
-Bedford OYC Tanker
-Bedford OYD GS
-Bedford QL series (QLD, QLR/QLC QLT TC)
-CMP FAT
-Commer Q2
-Crossley Q-Type
-Diamond T tank transporter
-Guy Quad-Ant FAT
-Guy Lizard ACV
-Humber FWD
-Karrier KT4
-Karrier K6
-Leyland Hippo Mk I/II
-Leyland Lynx
-Leyland Retriever
-Mack EXBX
-Morris 15cwt
-Morris CDSW
-Morris ML Ambulance
-Morris C8 GS/FAT
-Morris Commercial CD series
-Morris Commercial CS8
-Morris C9
-Morris GS Terrapin
-Morris PU
-Scammell Pioneer SV1S/SV2S
-Thornycroft Hathi (1924)
-Thornycroft Nubian
-Thornycroft Tartar
US ww2 Canadian Trucks
-Ford F8 CMP
-CMP C15/F15 (1940)
-CMP CGT/FGT FAT (1942)
-CMP C30/F30 LRGD (1942)
-CMP C30/F30 (1940)
-CMP C60/F60 LWB (1941)
-CMP C60/F60 SWB (1942)
-C-60X 6x6 CMP
-F-60H 6x4 CMP
-Ford F-GT CMP
-Chevy C-GT CMP
-C8A 1C1 HUP
-Chevrolet 3 ton truck
-Chevrolet WB 30cwt LRDG
-Chevrolet C8/C8A 4x2 CMP
French ww2 French Vehicles
-Berliet DGRA
-Berliet GDC
-Berliet GDM
-Berliet VDCA
-Berliet 30
-Bernard fuel carrier
-Citroën Kégresse P14 .
-Citroën Kégresse P17
-Citroën Kégresse P19
-Citroën Type 23
-Citroën 32U
-Citroën T45
-ELMAG
-Fiat France 38R
-Ford France
-Hotchkiss PKW Type 680
-Hotchkiss 686
-Hotchkiss 686 PNA
-Isobloc W843M medical bus
-Laffly S15R
-Laffly S15T
-Laffly V15T
-Laffly V15R
-Laffly W15T/R
-Laffly 20TL
-Laffly 25
-Laffly 45
-Latil TAR H2
-Latil M2Tl6
-Matford F917
-Panhard K113 Truck
-Panhard K125 Truck/Bus
-Peugeot 202
-Peugeot 402
-Peugeot DMA
-Peugeot DK
-Peugeot DK5
-Renault AHS
-Renault AHN
-Renault AHR
-Renault AGC
-Renault ADK
-Renault ADH
-Renault AHSs
-Saurer type 3CT
-Simca 5 staff car
-Simca 8 staff car
-Somua MCL
-Somua MCG
-Talbot staff car
-Unic TU1
-Unic P107
-Trippel SG6
-Willeme DU10
Soviet ww2 Soviet Trucks
-BZ-38
-GAZ AA M1927 M1932 M1941
-GAZ–MM
-GAZ AAA M1937/1940
-GAZ-60
-GAZ-65
-Ford Marmon HH6 Katiusha
-SU-1-12
-SU-4
-SU C-6
-SU-12
-Yag-6
-Yag-10
-Yag-10 SPG
-ZIS-5/V/BZ
-ZIS-6
-ZIS-12
-ZIS-22M HT
-ZIS-33 HT
-ZIS 41 HT
-ZIS 42M HT
-FN-Kégresse T3

Soviet staff cars
-GAZ A
-GAZ M1 "Emka"
-GAZ 11-73
-GAZ 61-73
-GAZ 67 Amphibious armoured cars
-PB-4
-PB-7
-BAD-2
Soviet ww2 Czech Trucks
-Praga N (1915)
-Praga TNSPE (1916) AC
-Praga MN, LN (1926)
-Praga RN (1933)
-Praga SND (SNDgs) (1937)
-Praga RND (1935)
-Praga T6 (1937) artillery tractor
-Praga RV (1934)
-Praga AV (1936)
-Tatra 26
-Tatra 57/57K (1932-1940)
-Tatra 72
-Tatra 82
-Tatra 92
-Tatra 81
-Tatra 111
US ww2 US Trucks
-Autocar U8144T 5/6-ton 4x4 truck
-Brockway/LaFrance 6-ton 6x6 truck, G512, 514, 547, 569
-Brockway 6-ton 6×6 truck
-Chevrolet m1931
-Chevrolet m1936
-Chevrolet G506 1.5 ton 4x4 truck
-Chevrolet G-7107 4-1/2 ton 4x4
-Chevrolet 3116 1-1/2 ton 4x2
-Chevrolet AFWX-354
-Corbitt 6-ton 6×6 truck
-Diamond T Model 980/981 12-ton 6x4 trucks (G159)
-Diamond T Model 968 4-ton 6x6 truck (G509)
-Diamond T Model 967
-Diamond T Model 970
-Diamond T Model 972
-Diamond M26 Dragon Wagon
-Diamond M19 Tank Transporter
-Diamond T Model 980
-Diamond T 4-ton 6x6 truck
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton truck
-Dodge WC-51/52 (3⁄4-ton Trucks, Weapons Carrier)
-Dodge WC-53 (3⁄4-ton Carryall)
-Dodge WC-54/64 (3⁄4-ton Ambulance)
-Dodge WC-55 (3⁄4-ton Truck, M6 Gun Motor Carriage)
-Dodge WC-56/57/58 (3⁄4-ton (Radio) Command Reconnaissance)
-Dodge WC-62/43 (G-507, 11⁄2-ton, 6x6 truck)
-Dodge M6 GMC
-Dodge T-234 "China/Burma" truck
-Ford B3000 S
-Ford V3000S
-Ford V3000A
-Ford BB
-Ford V8-51
-Ford m1931
-Ford V8 M1937
-Four Wheel Drive Auto Company (FWD) SU-COE 5-6 ton 4x4
-International B2
-International model 1937
-Inl KR-11 5 ton 4x2 dump truck
-Inl M5-6 318 2-1/2 ton 6x6 swb
-G8T 2-1/2 ton 4x2 Truck
-Mack NR15 10-ton 6x4
-Reo 28 XS 10-ton 6x4
-Studebaker US6x4 U-5
-Studebaker US6x4 U-7
-Studebaker US6x4 U-6
-Studebaker US6 U4 bz35S 2-1/2 ton 6x6 truck
-T1E1(M1) half-track
-T5 half-track
-T7 half-track
-T9 half-track
-Ward LaFrance
-White 6 ton 6x6 Prime Mover
-White G-691 444T
-White 6-ton 6×6 truck G512, 514, 526, 547

US ww2 Small truck/car & Misc.
Bantam Reconnaissance Car
Ford GTB
6x6 Willys 'MT-TUG' ("Super-Jeep")
-Willys MB light truck
-Ford GPA ("Seep")
Buick Century Series 60
1941 Plymouth P11 Staff Car
Ford Fordor 1942 Staff Car
Harley-Davidson WLA motorcycle
US ww2 Tractors. M1 Heavy Tractor:
  • Allis-Chalmers Model L
  • G-022 Caterpillar Model 60
  • G-89 Caterpillar RD7
  • G-98, G-107 Allis-Chalmers HD-10DW
  • G-101 International Harvester TD-18
  • G-126 Caterpillar D7
  • G-153 Caterpillar D8

Axis ww2 Axis Trucks


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Sd.Kfz 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 were half-tracks designed just before the war as prime movers, to carry supplies, ammunition, personal, and tow artillery. Many were also converted during the war as armored versions carrying AA FLAK guns (Flakvierling, 37 mm, or the legendary 88 mm Rheinmetall als used as tank hunters), or were converted as nebelwerfer (rocket launching armored vehicles). They were built by Hanomag, Steyr, Mercedes-Benz, Bussing and many other manufacturers until 1945, over 20,000 half-tracks.

German ww2 German Military trucks
-Opel Blitz
-Mercedes-Benz L3000
-Magirus A3000
-Krupp Protze Kfz.19
-Krupp Protze Kfz.21
-Krupp Protze Kfz.68
-Krupp Protze Kfz.69
-Krupp Protze Kfz.70
-Krupp Protze Kfz.81
-Krupp Protze Kfz.21
-Krupp Protze Kfz.83
-Borgward B 3000
-Skoda Rad Schlepper
-Ost RSO Porsche 175
-Steyr Type 2000A
-Einheits Lkw Kfz.62
-Krupp LKW L3
-Bussing-Nag 4500
-Opel Blitz Omnibus
-Bussing-Nag L
-Mercedes-Benz L1500
-Beute Studebaker
-Krupp L3H
-Hanomag SS-100
-Beute Ford B3000 S, V3000S, V3000A
-Beute Ford model BB
-Beute Ford model V8-51
-Beute Tatra 111

German ww2 German Half Tracks

-Sd.Kfz.2 Kettenkrad
-Sd.Kfz.3 Maultier
-Sd.Kfz.4 Panzerwerfer
-Sd.Kfz.6
-Sd.Kfz.7
-Sd.Kfz.8
-Sd.Kfz.9
-Sd.Kfz.10
-Sd.Kfz.11
-Schwere Wehrmachtsschlepper
-Leichte Wehrmachtsschlepper
-Raupenschlepper Ost

German ww2 German Staff Cars

-Horch 81
-Horch 108
-Kfz.15 Horch 901
-VW 182 Kübelwagen
-VW Schwimmwagen
italy ww2 Italian Military trucks
L. Trucks (Autocarro Leggere)
-ОМ Autocarretta da Montagna
-Camioneta SPA TL.37
-Camioneta AS.43
-SPA CL39
-SPA ТМ40
-Fiat 618
Med. Trucks (Autocarro Medio)
-Alfa Romeo 430RE
-Alfa Romeo 800RE
-Bianchi Miles
-Ceirano-50СМ
-FIAT-626 NM
-Isotta Fraschini D65
-Isotta Fraschini D80
-SPA Dovunque-35
-SPA Dovunque-41
-SPA AS.37
-SPA-38R
-Autocarro Dovunque SPA 41/42

H. Trucks (Autocarro Gigante)
-FIAT-633NM
-FIAT-634N
-FIAT-666
-Fiat 661
-Lancia Ro
-Lancia 3Ro and TE
-Lancia EsaRo
-ОМ Taurus
-ОМ Titano
-Autocarri Unificati Ursus

italy ww2 Artillery tractors
-Breda TP32
-Breda TP 40
-Breda TP 41
-Breda 6x4 51
-90/53 su Breda 52
-Breda 61 (licenced SdKfz-7)
-Fiat-SPA T.L.37
-Pavesi Р4.31 (L140)
-Fiat 727 half-track artillery tractor
-SPA TM40 wheeled artillery tractor

italy ww2 Staff Cars
-Alfa Romeo 6С2500 Coloniale
-Fiat 508M Ballila
-Fiat 508CM Coloniale
-Fiat 1100 (1937) (Balilla-1100 Coloniale)
-Lancia Aprilia Coloniale
-Bianchi VM 6C
-Fiat 2800 CMC

italy ww2 Motorcycles
-Benelli 500 M36/VLM
-Bianchi Supermil 500
-Gilera 500 LTE
-Moto Guzzi Alce/Trialce
-Volugrafo Aermoto 125
Japan ww2 IJA/IJN ww2 vehicles
-Toyota 4x4 Su-Ki (Amphibious truck)
-Isuzu Type 94 truck
-Type 94 6-Wheeled Truck
-Type 95 Mini-truck
-Type 97 4-Wheeled Truck
-Type 1 6-Wheeled Truck
-Type 2 Heavy Truck
-Toyota KB/KC Truck
-Nissan 80 Truck
-Nissan 180 Truck
Japan ww2 Tractors
-Type 92 5 t Prime Mover "I-Ke"
-Type 98 6 t Prime Mover "Ro-Ke"
-Type 92 8 t Prime Mover "Ni-Ku"
-Type 95 13 t Prime Mover "Ho-Fu"
-Type 94 4 t Prime Mover "Yo-Ke"
-Type 98 4 t Prime Mover "Shi-Ke"
-Type 96 AA Gun Prime Mover
-Type 98 20 mm AA Machine Cannon Carrier
-Type 98 Half-tracked Prime Mover "Ko-Hi"
-Type 98 20 mm AA Half-Track Vehicle
-Experimental Heavy Gun Tractor Chi-Ke
-Experimental Crawler Truck
-T G Experimental Crawler Truck
-Fordson Prime Mover
-Pavessi Gun Tractor
-50 hp Gun Tractor
-Komatsu 3 ton Tractor
-Light Prime Mover
-Clarton Prime Mover
-Holt 30

Japan ww2 Staff cars
-Toyota AA/AB/AC
-Type 93 6/4-Wheeled Passenger Car
-Type 95 Passenger Car "Kurogane"
-Type 98 Passenger Car
-Model 97 Nissan Staff Car, Nissan 70

Japan ww2 Motorcycles
-Rikuo Motorcycle
-Rikuo Type 97 Motorcycle
-Rikuo Type 93 side car

Japan ww2 Misc.
-Type 94 Ambulance
-Type 94 Repair Vehicle

Cold War & Modern Vehicles

Section pending completion.
BAV-485 * MAZ-543 * GAZ 46 * GAZ 67B * GAZ/UAZ-69 * GAZ 51 * GAZ 63* ZIL-131 * GAZ 66 * KrAZ-214 * KrAZ-255 * KrAZ-260 * KZKT-7428 * MAZ-535 * MAZ-537 * MAZ-7310 * Ural 375 * URAL 4320 * ZIL-135 * ZIL-151 * ZIL-157 * ZIL-157/PR-11M * ZIL-6 * ZIL-6


* * * * Praga V3S * Tatra 813
Ford G398 * Borgward BE3000 * Henschel HS 115 * Hanomag AL 28 * Mercedes Standard 4.5L * Mercedes LG 315/46 * Magirus-Deutz 170 * Magirus-Deutz 232 * Magirus-Deutz Jupiter 6x6 * Magirus-Deutz A 6500 * MAN KAT-1 * SLT 50 Elefant TT * Liebherr 8x8 GLW * MAN TGM Mil 18 4x4 * Liebherr 4x4 FKL * MAN 630 L2 * Mercedes LA * Unimog 404 2.5 standard * DKW Munga (1956) * Mercedes G-class * Volkswagen Type 181 (1968) * Volkswagen Iltis (1978) * MAN LX Tactical Trucks * M3 Amphibious Rig
Willys Jeep CJ series * Jeep M606 * Jeep M38A1 * Jeep M170 * M151 Mutt * M422 Mighty Mite * CJ V-35(/U) * M274 4x4 "Mule" * M37 Series 4x4 "Power Wagon" * M35 Series 6x6 * M54 Series 6x6 * M123/M125 6x6 * M715 series 4x4 * M561 6x6 "Gamma Goat" * M656 Series 8x8 * M880 series 4x4 * M809 series 6x6 * M520 4x4 "Goer" * M915 series 6x4 * M911 C-MET 8x6 * CUCV M1008 4x4 * HMMWV 4x4 * M939 Series 6x6 * HEMTT M977 8x8

Land-Rover * Bedford RL * Bedford TK/MK * Bedford TM * AEC Militant * Austin K9 * AEC Mandator TEL

IFA G5

Nissan 2.5 Truck * * Hitachi Type 73 artillery tractor (1974) * Toyota Type 73 * Isuzu HST * Nissan Patrol * Mitsubishi Type 73 * Toyota Land Cruiser *
Jiefang CA10 * Jiefang CA30
Beijing BJ212 * Beijing BJ2020 * Dongfeng EQ240/EQ2081 * Dongfeng EQ245/EQ2100 * Dongfeng EQ2050 * FAW MV3 * Hanyang HY4260 * Hanyang HY4330 * HTF5680A1 * SFQ2040 LieYing * Xiaolong XL2060 * Jiefang CA-30 * NJ2045/2046 * Shaanxi SX2190 * Shaanxi SX2150 * TA580/TAS5380 * TA5450/TAS5450 * TAS5500 * TAS5570 * TAS5690 * Type 82 truck * WS2300 * WS2400 * WS2500 * Wanshan W-2600 * WS21200 * WS51200
Renault TRM 10000 GP | Renault RM 700-100 TT | Renault TRM 2000 lorry | Berliet GBC 8 TK & Renault GBC 180 | Renault Kerax* | Iveco PPT3 | PML VPCM | Scania CCP10 | Scania TRA TOE NG | Renault ESRC | Renault ESRC AVIT | Renault CCPTA | Mercedes CCP3/5 | Renault Carapace | Renault CDLR | Renault PPDL | Renault CDLR CBH 385 | VLTT | Grizzly LUV | VOS-APP LUV | VOS-PAT LUV | Acmat VLRA | Panhard VPS LUV | Aquus AREG VLFS | Renault T4 VLTP NG | Arquus Trapper VT4 | French Mil. Quads | Renault Kangoo | French Bulldozers | Souvim Minesweeper | EFA Bridgelayer | Renault PFM BDL | SPRAT AVLB

Modern Trucks

Section pending completion.

India:

Tatra Prithvi | Ashok-Leyland Agni II TEL

Italy:

Iveco ACTL

Romania:

AMT 25, AMT 950, DAC, Roman, Dacia Duster.

Indonesia:

Rantis P6 ATAV

Russia:

UAZ Esaul * Kamaz 6560 * Pantsir S1

France:

Renault TRM 10000 GP | Renault RM 700-100 TT | Renault TRM 2000 lorry | <Renault Kerax | Iveco PPT3 | PML VPCM | Scania CCP10 | Scanian TRA TOE NG | Renault ESRC | Renault ESRC AVIT | Renault CCPTA | Mercedes CCP3/5 | Renault Carapace | Renault CDLR | Renault PPDL | Renault CDLR CBH 385 | VLTT | Grizzly LUV | VOS-APP LUV | VOS-PAT LUV | Acmat VLRA | Panhard VPS LUV | Aquus AREG VLFS | Renault T4 VLTP NG | | French Mil. Quads | Renault Kangoo | French Bulldozers | Souvim Minesweeper | EFA Bridgelayer | Renault PFM BDL | SPRAT AVLB

Germany:

Mercedes 250GD Wolf | Mercedes Wolf SSA | Mercedes G300 Greenliner | VW T3/T4/T6 van | BWM G650 GS | BMW F850 GS | BMW R1150 RT | BMW R1200 RT | KTM 400LS-E BdW | LIV(SO) Serval | German quads | Faun LST50-3 Elefant | Faun STL56 Franziska | Faun SLT Mammut | RMT HX81 | SAANH 70T | Mercedes Unimog U3/4/5000 | Mercedes Zetros | MAN KAT1 | RMT Multi 2 | RMT WLS 6x6 | RMT UTF WLKS 8x8 | | MAN TGS 8x4 | MAN TGS 6x4 | MAN RMMV TGA | Mercedes Atego | Mercedes Axor | EWK M3 Amph.Rig | Liebherr FKL | Liebherr FKM | T.Faun FKS ATF 30-2 | T.Faun FKS ATF 70-4 | T.Faun FKS ATF 100-5 | T.Faun FKS ATF 110-5 | T.Faun FKS ATF 120-5 Obelix | Steinbrock 2.5 Y4 | Herbst-Smag Orion V | Konecrane SMV 2216 TC3 | Ahlmann AS1600 | Liebherr 574 | MAN Cobra Radar | Liebherr LTM 1050

Netherlands:

Defenture Mammoth | to come | placeholder | MLC-70 WGMST

Turkey:

United Kingdom:

RWMIK land rover | Toyota Jankel Al-Thalab | Sky Sabre | Alvis Unipower | land Rover Wolf | Land Rover Defender BFA | Alvis Supacat ATMP | Marshall Gasket 3 | MAN SV (Mark I-III)

USA:

Interim Fast Attack Vehicle | M1161 Growler | Boeing Phantom Badger | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |