Willys Overland CJ

General purpose vehicle (1944-70)
USA - Around 100,000 vehicles in the military.

The American myth Civilized

The Willys GP was followed by CJ at the end of the war. It was followed itself by the Willys M38 (Willys MC). After 61,423 MC in 1950 to 1952, the M38A1 (Willys MD) followed in 1952-57 with 101,488 units and the Willys M606 in 1954-64 (6,500), and until 1968 with th M606A1 and 155,500 vehicles. All these create a relatively uniform family 972,830 vehicles strong also produced under licence by many NATO and non-aligned countries. Only the Humvee is considered its true, modern successor. But the story did not ended there, all these WW2 surplus would have been wasted if scrapped, so Willys sold already thousands to GI that grew fond of the vehicle, under collection licence, but also "civilized" its model sold as the "CJ", the MB civilian version. Willys in the meantime inherited from Bantam, that went bankrupt in 1955 the name "Jeep" which ended as a standalone brand, the oldest of all SUVs.

The CJ was essentially the "civilian jeep" (hence the initials). It should have been provented to anything else but a peaceful, civilian service, but it was not the case. It was produced under licence around the worlds for armies ad soldiered in many occasions aound the globe well until the 1990s.

Karl Probst's 1940 Bliz Buggy, Bantam answer to an army specification, ancestor of a famous lineage...

Development of the CJ

The grandaddy: CJ-1 (1942)

In 1942, the US Department of Agriculture tested the MB and considered adopting the vehicle but it went no further. The bulk of the production was reserved for the armies, immense numbers sold also to the allies via lend-lease. In early 1944 however it became evident the Allies were winning, and wartime production dwindled down. Willys started immediately to think on how the Jeep could reach the postwar civilian market and started drawing up updated plans, creating two prototypes dubbed CJ(-1) following the simple acronym "Civilian Jeep", faithful to previous uses. In May 1944 they underwent extensive road tests. They were born from quick modifications to civilian norms, such as adding a tailgate, a lower gearing, a drawbar, civilian-style canvas top, which did not required extensive tooling. That way, Willys was confident its first CJ as a quick proof-of-concept could evolve into more refined versions. The CJ-1 was manufactured from 1944, but production remained almost confidential, until the CJ-2s appeared in 1944 also. However after september 1945, far more stock military GPs were kept by returning GIs, just taking a special collection licence to drive them. Many others were resold to various militaries or ended in the civilian amrket with more or less modifications to make them legal. A hefty number survived to this day.

The Agri-Jeep: CJ-2 (1944)

As said previously, the minister of agriculture was interested by the vehicle and in 1944, Willys-Overland created the CJ-2 not available for retail sale but only the ministry. Only around 40 to 45 of these now rare and well searched for CJ-2s, the "AgriJeeps", appeared as second-generation prototypes for production, also for testing. They used the stock Willys Go Devil engine but were stripped of all military features (like the blackout lighting, pivot gun mounts, etc) and their body features included tailgates, power take-offs and engine governors, a column-shift T90 manual transmission with 5.38 gears and 2.43:1 low-range transfer cases plus new driver tool indentations. The rear wheelwells were redesigned to maximize seating, confort wa improved, and they were moved rearward. Also new canvas tops with new weathertight designs were adopted. The new canvas half-top with roll-down doors appeared. The Go-Devil L-head engine also had a different carburetor and ignition system, also civilian grade.

Two batched of CJ-2s were built with small differences between them for powertrain components notably and these “pilot models” were still painted olive-drab with a brass “JEEP” badge on the windshield base, and later the "Willys" stamping on the hood sides and rear. Some had the "AgriJeep" plaque. CJ-2A Jeeps built from 1945 also had a spare tire mounted forward of the passenger-side rear wheel, or aft of the rear wheel at the end of the serie.

The mass-produced: CJ-2A (1945-49)


The CJ-2A of 1946. Still military, DNA but this semi-experimental "agri-jeep" with fancy colors only led the way. Many GIs not able to purchase their military Jeeps after their service went for the CJ-3 instead.

From tests with the CJ-2 a first batch of CJ models appeared in 1945 as the Willys-Overland CJ-2A. It was also called the "Universal Jeep" and sometimes in documentations caleled the "agrijeep" as a brand. The CJ-2A had the same tailgate and side-mounted spare wheel as the CJ-2 but its engine grilles were different. Instead of recessed headlights, nine-slot grilles, the CJ-2A had larger and bulging headlights, plus a seven-slot grille. The engine was swapped for the L-134 Go-Devil coupled with the T-90 transmission, three speed, better suited for road use. Production started as the war was not over yet, on 17 July 1945 and around 9,000 were manufactured until September 1945, many using in some cases WW2 stock MB components. Somtimes the frames themselves were stock WW2as smetimes also the full floating rear axle until exhaustion of spares.

The stronger Dana/Spicer model 41 axle was used afterwards, but for long, production was plagued by suppliers strikes, quite common after the war, and production was sluggish until early 1946.

Soon, happy GIs purchased their Jeep for farming, ranching, go campign/fishing/hunting in the wild for leisure, but the vehicle had industrial applications and were soon completed with many options such as driver side mirror, new front passenger and rear seats, a center rear-view mirror and new canvas top, a front and rear power take-off or a belt pulley drive, a capstan winch for woodsmen and safari goers, a governor and rear hydraulic lift, and for Canada a snow plow and heater, while the payload could be equipped with a welder, a generator and mower.

New brake discs also, a new redesigned front bumper weight and heavy-duty springs, dual vacuum windshield wipers and dual taillights plus hot-climate radiator and brush guard, driveshaft guards, and side steps. In addition the initial olive army green was now superseded by a range of lively color combinations. Until 1949, the CJ-2As production was ramped-up and these Vehicles sold as pastries, with a grand total of 214,760 CJ-2As. Due to their similarity with the original MB, many collectioners later retrofitted them with WW2 stock components.

To be clear, the C2JA was tested, but not used by the US Army. However they ended in many south american and caribbean armies, in Africa and in Europe as well in full military service. Two countries for example had it in large numbers: South Africa and the Swiss Army, possibly refurbished with WW2 stock parts. In the case of SANDF, they received 249 CJ2a's in 1948, and they differed by the color of the tub, a darker olive drab and all other parts painted black. There was also a specific rectangular indentation and stamping on the passenger floor.


CJ-2A tested as a tractor in the netherlands. The long history of SUVs started with rustic "agri-jeeps", like the Range Rover.

CJ-3A, the fifties jeep (1949-53)

Still "rough and ready", much beloved in its simplicity, the 1950s millesime of the Willys Jeep CJ was powered by Willys' 60 hp (45 kW; 61 PS) L-134 Go-Devil four-cylinder engine. It had a same T-90 transmission as before and a Dana 18 transfer case, Dana 25 front axle, Dana 41/44 rear axle. Also there was now a one-piece windshield with a vent, plus automatic wipers at its bottom. The CJ-3A also had beefed-up suspensions to perform agricultural and woodslands tasks and carry heavy loads. There was also a shorter rear wheelwell of 32 in (810 mm) (instead of 34 in (860 mm)) while the driver's seat was moved a bit rearward. In 1951, a "pure" barebone "Farm Jeep/Jeep Tractor" was offered, for field use only with a a power takeoff. Total production of the CJ-3A reached 131,843, less than the previous vehicle, until 1953. Japan soon was interested by the models, used during the occupation, and about 550 CJ3-As were assembled by Mitsubishi. They were called J1/J2, from late 1952 tod early 1953, but were not used by the JSDGF but instead only the police and forestry agency. The army tested it again and this time was interested enough to order Willys a modified army vehicle, that became the Willys MC, or M38, complementing the WW2 stocks of tired Ford and Willys jeeps. Its successor, the CJ-3B was not the last iteration of the mode, far from it. The CJ-4 was a prototype of 1951 also called "X-151" to test the new Willys Hurricane engine. I also had a longer wheelbase at 81 in (2,057 mm). Its body tub mixed the shaped later found on the CJ-3B and CJ-5. It was rejected but used anyway by factory employee. The CJ-4M and CJ-4MA (XM170) were paper projects which were precursors of the M38A1 and M170 military models.

CJ-3B, back to the army (1953-68)

Despite the far larger duration of the production, this model proved less popular on the civilian market, and much more on the military market, declined under licence around the world. Compared to the WW2 stock model, this much-improved variant found enough interest for massive purchases from various armies around the world. This happened as the same year the new model appeared, Willys-Overland was acquired by Kaiser Motors. And it became the "Kaiser Willys" jeep. The CJ-3B had a distinctive higher grille and higher hood as well to house the much larger Willys Hurricane engine, tested on the CJ-4. It was coupled with the same transmission alsthough an optional four-speed manual transmission became optional in 1963. Its turning radius was a bit shorter also at 17 ft 6 in (5.3 m) and the total production in the US alone, for the cvilian market only reached 155,494 vehicles on a grand total of 196,000 cumulated worldwide.

Indeed, with little modification, the CJ-3B was became the M606 military jeep, exported until 1968. It was given many heavy-duty/military options (larger tires and reinforced springs, black-out lighting, olive drab paint, black interiors, trailer hitch. The M606 was also shipped as the CJ-3B, largely distributed through the Mutual Defense Assistance Program (MDAP) in the 1960s. It was also licenced:

Licenced versions were ofte produced in civilian and military variants, even long after 1968: Mitsubishi in Japan and Mahindra in India were the most notable of these. Mitsubishi's J3 competed with the the Nissan Patrol and Toyota Land Cruiser, and production stopped production in 1998, but Mahindra went on, amazingly, until October 2010... The Mahindra CJ was produced as a four-seater CJ 340 and a six-seater CJ 540 fitted with Peugeot 64 hp (48 kW; 65 PS) engines. The Mahindra CJ saw action notably during the Indo-Pakistani war of 1971, famously fitted with 105 mm recoiless rifles. The CJ-3B became also a Turkish best-seller as Tuzla 1013, produced by Türk Willys Overland, Tuzla (Kocaeli, the first first off-road vehicle plant in Turkey by 1954). In Japan, the final military version was called J24A, with a 135PS, improved 4DR5 engine and front-mounted air-to-air intercooler, used by the JSDGF until the 1980s.

CJ-5, the "universal Jeep" (1954-83)

Probably the most famous of all these was the CJ-5, mostly for the civilian market. The Willys CJ-5 and "Jeep CJ-5" in the 1960s was both the fruit of Kaiser's own additions to the design and the Korean War M38A1. Production ran parralel to the CJ-3B, and went on for three decades. It was basically a civilian, "tamed" version of the Willys M38A1, so logically, never used by the US Military. New, more modeen diesel engines appeared in the 1960s such as the British-made Perkins 192 cu in I4 (62 hp) and as kaiser purchased the licence for the Buick 225 cu in (3.7 L) V6 Dauntless engine, it became an option on the CJ-5 and CJ-6. Until then the Willys Hurricane was believed rather primitive and underpowered. The V6 met instant success and after 1968, three quarters of of CJ-5s were sold with that option, until 1971 when a purchase was made by the American Motors Corporation (AMC). Also The "Trac-Lok" limited-slip differential appeared that same year, ad under AMC the vehicle acquired a decidedly more sporty one, inundated with modern features. It really became a SUV, especially at a time of muscle cars, when fitted with AMC's 304 cu in (5.0 L) V8 engine... Also in 1970 appeared one of the most successful sub-brand, the "Renegade". The CJ-5 was the further away verspn from the military model to the point there was little incentive to convert it back to military use or for any army to purchase it. The vehicle was also licenced in Australia and Brazil.

CJ-6, the civilian M170 (1954-83)

Honorable mention too for the CJ-6 which was basically a civilian declination of the army M170, adopted by the US Army in 1953, and "civilized" in 1955. Production went on until 1981, sometimes refusbishing surplus M170s. It was basicallly a stretched CJ-5, with a 20 in (508 mm) longer wheelbase at 101 inches and from 1972, to 103.5 inches. This extended chassis made possible a second row of seats (so 6 seats and more), competing with the British range rover. The M170 was close stilll to the M38A1 but its passenger-door opening extended back to the rear wheel well. V6 and V8 engine were proposed, and many options and features. The state was also interested and the U.S. Forest Service used it massively. The model was no longer proposed in 1975, to not spil the introduction of the CJ-7. Only 50,172 were produced until 1981, making this vehicle a moderate scarcity as of today. Better success was obtained under licence in Sweden and South America, and South Africa with Volkswagen's pats or Israel, by Kaiser Haifa and in Nazareth.

CJ-7, the last hurrah for the CJ (1976-86)

The CJ-7 succeeded to the CJ-5, but had a longer wheelbase (10 inches more) and curved side entry cutouts more squarish to accommodate hinged doors. The chassis was now made of two parallel longitudinal main c-section rails and the rear section stepped out to allow a closer mounting of the springs and shock absorbers, helping stability immensely. In all, 379,299 were over 11 years. It also featured the automatic all-wheel drive "Quadra-Trac", an optional molded hardtop and steel doors. The rest were cosmetic range colors, markings and accesories. The engines too, 145 cu in (2.4 L) diesel, 258 Cu-in straight si, 150 cu-in four-cyl., or AMC V8 or General Motors diesel common to Isuzu produced in 1980-1982. Interestingly, this model attracted military orders: The Canadian Army took delivery of 195 militarized versions in 1985, as a stop-gap measure between the M38A1 retirement and introduction of the local Bombardier Iltis. The "last hurrah" of the brand was incarnated by the CJ-8 Scrambler, a long-wheelbase version of 1981-1986 (103.5 in (2,629 mm) wheelbase) with a popular pick-up style. Apart in the south-american drug cartels where it could have been modified, armed and armoured, this was a purely civilian vehicle, followed by the Jeep CJ-10, where the brand went "full pickup", also exported to Australia. But the ultimate CJ-10A was only produced in Mexico.

Links about the Jeep

The Willys CJ on Wikipedia
On thecj2apage.com
On cherokee-fr.com
On kaiserwillys.com
On silodrome.com
On jeepfederation.com
On classic-car-history.com
Original brochure, Israel 1970s
cj3a.info
thecj2apage.com
Brazilian Jipe
Willys Viasa
Japanese Mistubishi J0
CJ5 super jeep
Car Folio
J7 Jamboree
Jeeps in Australia
about_willys_jeep_cj5_
Mahibdra Jeep
On imcdb.org
Video: The CJ3B on the road

Willys CJ-3B specifications (1953)

Dimensions (L-w-h)129.875 in (3,299 mm), rest as CJ-3
Wheelbase80 in (2,032 mm)
Curb weight, battle ready1080 kg ( lbs)
Crew1+3 (driver +3 passengers)
PropulsionWillys 134 cu in (2.2 L) Hurricane I4
Transmission3-speed manual 2 reverse, 2-speed Dana-18 transfer case
Top speed110 km/h (65 mph) road, 50 km/h (29 mph) off-road
Maximum range500 km (290 mi)

Willys MB of WW2, the legend.

A Willys MB used in Vietnam

A Willys MB used in Vietnam, 1968; Lil'Brutus, armored.



CJ-2A in military service

Mahindra CJ-3B

Mahindra CJ-3B used by the Indian Army in the 1971 indo-pak war.

US Army M38A1

US Army M38A1, from which was derived the CJ-5

CJ-3B with tarpaulin

CJ-3B with tarpaulin

M606, the military equivalent to the CJ-3B

M606, the military equivalent to the CJ-3B

Gallery


Willys_CJ-2A


Willys_Overland_CJ-3a


Willys-jeep-CJ3B


1963_Turk_Willys_CJ-3B


Jeep_M170_Ambulance


Jeep_CJ6


Kaiser_Willys-M38A1


Mitsubishi_1955_J-serie-Jeep


Spanish-Cj_6

WW1 Vehicles

British ww2 WWI trucks
FR: Berliet CBA, Berliet Type M, Châtillon-Panhard, Latil TAR, Panhard-Genty 24 HP, Renault EG

allied ww2 Allied ww2 Vehicles

British ww2 British Vehicles
-AEC Armoured Command Vehicle (415)
-AEC Matador
-Albion CX22S
-Albion FT15N
-Albion WD.CX24
-Austin K2/Y Ambulance
-Austin K3
-Austin K4
-Austin K4 Dropside
-Austin K5
-Austin K6 GS
-Austin K6 Gantry
-Bedford MW
-Bedford OXA Armoured
-Bedford OXC Semi-trailer
-Bedford OXD GS
-Bedford OYC Tanker
-Bedford OYD GS
-Bedford QL series (QLD, QLR/QLC QLT TC)
-CMP FAT
-CMP Truck
-Commer Q2
-Crossley Q-Type
-Diamond T tank transporter
-Guy Quad-Ant FAT
-Guy Lizard ACV
-Humber FWD
-Karrier KT4
-Karrier K6
-Leyland Hippo Mk I/II
-Leyland Lynx
-Leyland Retriever
-Mack EXBX
-Morris 15cwt
-Morris CDSW
-Morris ML Ambulance
-Morris C8 GS/FAT
-Morris Commercial CD series
-Morris Commercial CS8
-Morris C9
-Morris GS Terrapin
-Morris PU
-Scammell Pioneer SV1S/SV2S
-Thornycroft Hathi (1924)
-Thornycroft Nubian
-Thornycroft Tartar
French ww2 French Vehicles
-Berliet DGRA
-Berliet GDC
-Berliet GDM
-Berliet VDCA
-Berliet 30
-Bernard fuel carrier
-Citroën Kégresse P14 .
-Citroën Kégresse P17
-Citroën Kégresse P19
-Citroën Type 23
-Citroën 32U
-Citroën T45
-ELMAG
-Fiat France 38R
-Ford France
-Hotchkiss PKW Type 680
-Hotchkiss 686
-Hotchkiss 686 PNA
-Isobloc W843M medical bus
-Laffly S15R
-Laffly S15T
-Laffly V15T
-Laffly V15R
-Laffly W15T/R
-Laffly 20TL
-Latil TAR H2
-Latil M2Tl6
-Matford F917
-Panhard K113
-Panhard K113
-Peugeot 202
-Peugeot 402
-Peugeot DMA
-Peugeot DK
-Peugeot DK5
-Renault AHS
-Renault AHN
-Renault AHR
-Renault AGC
-Renault ADK
-Renault ADH
-Renault AHSs
-Saurer type 3CT
-Simca 5 staff car
-Simca 8 staff car
-Somua MCL
-Somua MCG
-Talbot staff car
-Unic TU1
-Unic P107
-Trippel SG6
-Willeme DU10
Soviet ww2 Soviet Trucks
-BZ-38
-GAZ AA M1927 M1932 M1941
-GAZ–MM
-GAZ AAA M1937
-GAZ AAA M1940
-GAZ-60
-GAZ-65
-Ford Marmon HH6 Katiusha
-SU-1-12
-SU-4
-SU C-6
-SU-12
-Yag-6
-Yag-10
-Yag-10 SPG
-ZIS-5/V/BZ
-ZIS-6
-ZIS-12
-ZIS-22M HT
-ZIS-33 HT
-ZIS 41 HT
-ZIS 42M HT
-FN-Kégresse T3

Soviet staff cars
-GAZ A
-GAZ M1 "Emka"
-GAZ 11-73
-GAZ 61-73
-GAZ 67 Amphibious armoured cars
-PB-4
-PB-7
-BAD-2
US ww2 US Trucks
-Ford B3000 S
-Ford V3000S
-Ford V3000A,
-Ford BB
-Ford V8-51
-Ford m1931
-Ford V8 M1937
-T1E1(M1) half-track
-T5 half-track
-T7 half-track
-T9 half-track
-G8T 2-1/2 ton 4x2 Truck
-International B2
-International model 1937
-Chevrolet m1931
-Chevrolet m1936
-Chevrolet G-506 ​1 1⁄2-ton 4x4
-Chevrolet G-7107 4-1/2 ton 4x4
-Chevrolet 3116 1-1/2 ton 4x2
-Studebaker US6x4 U7
-Studebaker US6x4 U-6
-Studebaker US6x6 U-5 6x4
-Studebaker US6 U4 bz35S 2-1/2 ton 6x6 truck
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton Ambulance
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton Carry-all
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton (Radio) Command Reconnaissance
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton Truck, Closed Cab
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton Truck, Open Cab
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton (Radio) Panel Van
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton Telephone Service (K50)
-Dodge 1⁄2-ton Truck, Emergency Repair
-Dodge WC-51/52 (3⁄4-ton Trucks, Weapons Carrier)
-Dodge WC-53 (3⁄4-ton Carryall)
-Dodge WC-54/64 (3⁄4-ton Ambulance)
-Dodge WC-55 (3⁄4-ton Truck, M6 Gun Motor Carriage)
-Dodge WC-56/57/58 (3⁄4-ton (Radio) Command Reconnaissance)
-Dodge WC-62/43 (G-507, 11⁄2-ton, 6x6 truck)
-Dodge M6 GMC
-GMC CCKW Cargo Truck
-GMC CCKW 353 2-1/2 Ton Truck
-GMC SWB CCKW-352
-GMC 1939 ACKWX 353 3 ton 6x6 truck
-GMC AFWX-353 3 ton 6x4 truck
-GMC DUKW 353 2-1/2 ton 6x6 truck
-GMC C.O.E. AFKWX
-Diamond T Model 980/981 12-ton 6x4 trucks (G159)
-Diamond T Model 968 4-ton 6x6 truck (G509)
-Diamond T Model 967
-Diamond T Model 970
-Diamond T Model 972
-Diamond M26 Dragon Wagon
-Diamond M19 Tank Transporter
-Diamond T Model 980
-Diamond T 4-ton 6x6 truck
-Autocar U8144T 5/6-ton 4x4 truck
-Brockway/LaFrance 6-ton 6x6 truck, G512, 514, 547, 569
-White/Corbitt 6 ton 6x6 Prime Mover
-Brockway
-Corbitt
-Ward LaFrance
-Four Wheel Drive Auto Company (FWD) SU-COE 5-6 ton 4x4
-White Motor Company
-Inl KR-11 5 ton 4x2 dump truck
-Inl M5-6 318 2-1/2 ton 6x6 swb
-Mack NR15 10-ton 6x4
-Reo 28 XS 10-ton 6x4

US ww2 Small truck/car & Misc.
Bantam Reconnaissance Car
Ford GTB
6x6 Willys 'MT-TUG' ("Super-Jeep")
-Willys MB light truck
-Ford GPA ("Seep")
Buick Century Series 60
1941 Plymouth P11 Staff Car
Ford Fordor 1942 Staff Car
Harley-Davidson WLA motorcycle

Axis ww2 Axis Trucks


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Sd.Kfz 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 were half-tracks designed just before the war as prime movers, to carry supplies, ammunition, personal, and tow artillery. Many were also converted during the war as armored versions carrying AA FLAK guns (Flakvierling, 37 mm, or the legendary 88 mm Rheinmetall als used as tank hunters), or were converted as nebelwerfer (rocket launching armored vehicles). They were built by Hanomag, Steyr, Mercedes-Benz, Bussing and many other manufacturers until 1945, over 20,000 half-tracks.

German ww2 German Military trucks
-Opel Blitz
-Opel Maultier
-Mercedes-Benz L3000
-Magirus A3000
-Krupp Protze Kfz.19
-Krupp Protze Kfz.21
-Krupp Protze Kfz.68
-Krupp Protze Kfz.69
-Krupp Protze Kfz.70
-Krupp Protze Kfz.81
-Krupp Protze Kfz.21
-Krupp Protze Kfz.83
-Borgward B 3000
-Skoda Rad Schlepper
-Ost RSO Porsche 175
-Steyr Type 2000A
-Einheits Lkw Kfz.62
-Krupp LKW L3
-Bussing-Nag 4500
-Opel Blitz Omnibus
-Bussing-Nag L
-Mercedes-Benz L1500
-Beute Studebaker
-Krupp L3H
-Hanomag SS-100
-Beute Ford B3000 S, V3000S, V3000A
-Beute Ford model BB
-Beute Ford model V8-51
-Beute Tatra 111

German ww2 German Staff Cars

-Horch 81
-Horch 108
-VW 182 Kübelwagen
-VW Schwimmwagen
-Sd.Kfz.2 Kettenkrad
italy ww2 Italian Military trucks
L. Trucks (Autocarro Leggere)
-Breda-32
-Breda-40
-Breda-41
-ОМ-32 Autocarretta da Montagna
-ОМ-36DM
-Camioneta SPA TL.37
-Camioneta AS.43
-SPA CL39
-SPA ТМ40
-Fiat 618

Med. Trucks (Autocarro Medio)
-Alfa Romeo 430RE
-Alfa Romeo 800RE
-Breda Dovunque-41
-Bianchi Miles
-Ceirano-50СМ
-FIAT-626 NM
-Isotta Fraschini D65
-Isotta Fraschini D80
-SPA Dovunque-35
-SPA Dovunque-41
-SPA AS.37
-SPA-38R
-Autocarro Dovunque SPA 41/42

H. Trucks (Autocarro Gigante)
-FIAT-633NM
-FIAT-634N
-FIAT-666
-Fiat 661
-Lancia Ro
-Lancia 3Ro
-Lancia EsaRo
-ОМ Taurus
-ОМ Titano
-Autocarreta Mod.35
-Autocarri Unificati Ursus

italy ww2 Artillery tractors
-Breda 51
-Breda 52
-Breda 61 (licenced SdKfz-7)
-Fiat-SPA T.L.37
-Pavesi Р4.31 (L140)
-Fiat 727 - half-track artillery tractor
-SPA TM40 - wheeled artillery tractor

italy ww2 Staff Cars -Alfa Romeo 6С2500 Coloniale
-Fiat 508M/CM Ballila
-Fiat 1100 (1937) (Balilla-1100 Coloniale)
-Lancia Aprilia Coloniale
-Bianchi VM 6C
-Fiat 2800 CMC

italy ww2 Motorcycles
-Benelli 500 M36/VLM
-Bianchi Supermil 500
-Gilera 500 LTE
-Moto Guzzi Alce/Trialce
-Volugrafo Aermoto 125
Japan ww2 IJA/IJN ww2 vehicles
-Toyota 4x4 Su-Ki (Amphibious truck)
-Isuzu Type 94 truck
-Type 94 6-Wheeled Truck
-Type 95 Mini-truck
-Type 97 4-Wheeled Truck
-Type 1 6-Wheeled Truck
-Type 2 Heavy Truck
-Toyota KB/KC Truck
-Nissan 80 Truck
-Nissan 180 Truck
-Amphibious Truck "Su-Ki"

Japan ww2 Tractors
-Type 92 5 t Prime Mover "I-Ke"
-Type 98 6 t Prime Mover "Ro-Ke"
-Type 92 8 t Prime Mover "Ni-Ku"
-Type 95 13 t Prime Mover "Ho-Fu"
-Type 94 4 t Prime Mover "Yo-Ke"
-Type 98 4 t Prime Mover "Shi-Ke"
-Type 96 AA Gun Prime Mover
-Type 98 20 mm AA Machine Cannon Carrier
-Type 98 Half-tracked Prime Mover "Ko-Hi"
-Type 98 20 mm AA Half-Track Vehicle
-Experimental Heavy Gun Tractor Chi-Ke
-Experimental Crawler Truck
-T G Experimental Crawler Truck
-Fordson Prime Mover
-Pavessi Gun Tractor
-50 hp Gun Tractor
-Komatsu 3 ton Tractor
-Light Prime Mover
-Clarton Prime Mover
-Holt 30

Japan ww2 Staff cars
-Toyota AA/AB/AC
-Type 93 6/4-Wheeled Passenger Car
-Type 95 Passenger Car "Kurogane"
-Type 98 Passenger Car
-Model 97 Nissan Staff Car, Nissan 70

Japan ww2 Motorcycles
-Rikuo Motorcycle
-Rikuo Type 97 Motorcycle
-Rikuo Type 93 side car

Japan ww2 Misc.
-Type 94 Ambulance
-Type 94 Repair Vehicle

Cold War